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Orange Award for New Writers

Kamila Shamsie is the author of four novels, including the forthcoming Broken Verses (Bloomsbury, April 2005). She is the recipient of a fellowship from the Arts Council

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2005 prize

We Need to Talk About Kevin by Lionel Shriver (Serpent’s Tail) Kevin Katchadourian killed seven of his fellow high-school students, a cafeteria worker and a teacher,

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What sparked 26a?

It was sparked by the death of someone close to me. I had a weirdly comic and mystifying experience of grief and bereavement that had

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Resources for writers

The Orange Award for New Writers will be awarded for the first time in 2005 to coincide with the Orange Prize for Fiction’s 10th birthday celebrations.

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EDITOR’S CHOICE

Resources for writers

The Orange Award for New Writers will be awarded for the first time in 2005 to coincide with the Orange Prize for Fiction’s 10th birthday celebrations. The winner will receive £10,000 to help her pursue her work with greater freedom. Winner announced (7 June 2005) Shortlist announced (25 April 2005) The judges will

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Women Fail to Seduce Male Readers

New research published by the Orange Prize for Fiction reveals that women still have to work twice as hard as men to get their books read by the opposite sex. Additionally men will often pass over books written by men if the choice of cover design or title indicates that it is a ‘female read’ regardless of subject matter. The research [in which twenty books were shown to 200 respondents – male and female] was commissioned to address the following questions: How important is the gender of the author in our choice of books? To what extent are particular authors’ books perceived as being written mainly for women, for men or for both and on what basis is this judgement

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2005 Prize – Speeches

Kate Mosse “My name is Kate Mosse and I’m one of the Founders and the Honorary Director of the Orange Prize for Fiction. And it gives me enormous pleasure to welcome you all to the 10th Orange Prize for Fiction. That is the cue for a big cheer please! Many of you will have been at these parties for the past 10 years. And, really, many of us, who are involved with the prize are still pinching ourselves and saying we can’t believe it. We did 10 years and we’re still going strong. You’ll have noticed that there have been lots of pieces in the paper recently looking back over the past 10 years. And one of the questions that I’ve

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Resources for writers

The Orange Award for New Writers will be awarded for the first time in 2005 to coincide with the Orange Prize for Fiction’s 10th birthday celebrations. The winner will receive £10,000 to help her pursue her work with greater freedom. Winner announced (7 June 2005) Shortlist announced (25 April 2005) The judges will be looking for emerging talent and the evidence of future potential and seeking to identify writers of excellence, originality and accessibility. All first works of fiction – including novels, short story collections and novellas – written by women of any age or nationality and published in book form in the UK between 1st April 2004 and 31st March 2005 will be eligible. Novels can be entered for both the Orange

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Shortlisted Author Interview – Meg Rosoff

What sparked How I Live Now? It felt to me as if thousands of loose elements floating in space suddenly converged into a book: the horrible premature death of my youngest sister from cancer, a desperate desire to get out of advertising, a need to impress my new agent, the early rumblings of the Iraq war … for a start. When did you first realise you wanted to write fiction? Very early. I began writing stories when I was about seven (mainly about horses), but lost my nerve later on. It took 38 years for me to start writing fiction again. As Shakespeare says, ‘the readiness is all.’ And what did you do before you started writing? I began my

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Shortlisted Author Interview Nell Freudenberger

What sparked Lucky Girls? After I graduated from college, I got a job teaching English in Bangkok. From there I went to India for the first time, and fell in love a bit. I went back to Delhi the following summer and lived in a strange apartment on Pandara Road, with a particularly memorable landlady. Once I was home in New York again, I found myself missing that time in Delhi in particular. I was working in an office, and in the mornings before work I started writing the first story in this book, “Lucky Girls.” I had always thought that I couldn’t write a story set in India – maybe I thought an American couldn’t write about India. Once

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What sparked 26a?

It was sparked by the death of someone close to me. I had a weirdly comic and mystifying experience of grief and bereavement that had a lot to do with being a twin. The idea of being cut in half but also doubled by the experience stayed with me for a long time before I began writing the book, which eventually became a novel, essentially, about the relationship between twins. Other themes in the book, such as marriage and dual heritage, and the contrasts of comedy and tragedy, realism and the supernatural, became metaphors for twinness, for ‘two-ness’. When did you first realise you wanted to write fiction? I used to read a lot when I was a teenager and

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